Five Myths that Block Effective Strategies Targeting Sexual Assault on College Campuses

fatima-goss-graves-200-x-200Guest Contributor:  Fatima Goss Graves, Senior Vice President for Program, National Women’s Law Center

Students around the country have already begun pouring back onto college campuses, ready to embark on a new academic year. This year many students will return to find their schools under investigation by the Department of Education for failing to effectively address sexual violence on campus.  Title IX’s nearly 45-year-old ban on sex discrimination in education requires schools that take federal dollars –virtually all schools – to take prompt and effective steps to address harassment and violence. With over 200 universities facing pending complaints, the problem of sexual assault finally has caught the attention of the very policymakers and educators who can make a difference.

But efforts to transform the response to sexual assault will fail if focused on the wrong solutions. Here are five myths that can prevent meaningful approaches to combatting sexual assault on college campuses. Continue reading “Five Myths that Block Effective Strategies Targeting Sexual Assault on College Campuses”

Second Look – A week in review.

In NYC, Two Moms Describe the Intimacy of #BlackLivesMatter – An in depth look at modern motherhood in the looming shadow of implicit bias by police.

Ditch high heels to promote equality at work, Theresa May told – From across the pond, many are requesting that the British Prime Minister set an example for equality in the workplace and skip high heels in favor of flat footwear.

Jeffrey Tambor won an Emmy for playing a transgender woman, but even he thinks that’s problematicTransparent actor, Jeffrey Tambor, calls for Hollywood to look to trans actors to portray trans characters during his acceptance speech for Best Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. The Washington Post discusses his impassioned plea.

The Problem With Having All-White State Supreme Courts – TakePart discusses a lawsuit filed by the Alabama State Conference of the NAACP and four citizens, alleging that Alabama process for choosing appellate judges discriminate on the basis of race. The article takes special notice of Judge John H. England Jr., one of the three black justices to sit on the Alabama Supreme Court, and of the fact that 31 other states do not have an African American on their highest court.

Red State Blues – Jedediah Purdy for the New Republic discusses two books—one written by a native Appalachian and another by a sociologist—that delve into the relationship between Trump and Tea Party Conservatives.

Hari Kondabolu Says His Mom Is Hilarious – And Not Because of Her Accent – Hari Kondabolu, stand-up comedian, discusses race, identity, and white fragility in comedy.

Second Look is a monthly content round-up of articles, videos, podcasts, and blog posts highlighting all things race, gender, and/or social justice. Feel free to discuss your thoughts or opinions in the comments below.

Cincinnati Preschool Expansion, Issue 44: For our children and their teachers

Guest Contributor:  Clement Tsao, (Cincinnati Law ’12), Labor Attorney, Cook& Logothetis, LLC

Much has bclement-tsaoeen written about the benefits of preschool and quality early learning programs. Significant investments in preschool have been linked to improved kindergarten readiness, future academic success, a reduced achievement gap for students of color, as well as long-term savings on government and taxpayers. If you’re not yet convinced, you can check out some good research and writing on the arguments for preschool investment here, here, here and here.

But, high quality preschool isn’t just about education and economics; investment in preschool is also about labor policy. After all, it’s people, i.e., the teachers, who engage with our children and can be a determinative factor in a quality learning environment. That’s why investing in preschool also requires investing in our current and future preschool teachers.

This fall, Cincinnati voters will have the opportunity to do both, thanks to Issue 44.  Continue reading “Cincinnati Preschool Expansion, Issue 44: For our children and their teachers”

Second Look – A week in review.

The Armed Protests Outside Brock Turner’s Home Are Dangerously Counterproductive  – Christina Cauterucci of Slate discusses the impact of vigilante protesting.

At the Sacred Stone Camp, A Coalition Joins Forces to Protect the Land – A coalition is forming in North Dakota where a varied group of people are acting as protectors of the land seeking to stop the development of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The protestors prepare to act as resistance in the fight for the community’s right to land and clean water. This topic has garnered both national and international attention as a battle for the survival of Native people.

The Uncomfortable Truth about Children’s Books – Dashka Slater for Mother Jones discusses the complexities of publishing children’s books in a time when diversity is somehow mistaken from exclusion and social media polices publishers.

Ava DuVernay on Directing Queen Sugar, Properly Lighting Actors of Color, and Why She Used to Be More Brave – The Academy Award-nominated director of Selma discusses with the Vulture TV Podcast the stylistic and directorial decisions in her first foray into television with OWN’s Queen Sugar.

Are Cracker, White Trash, & Redneck Racist? – For MTV News Decoded, Franchesca Ramsey discusses the linguistic history, racial context, and classist realities of references for poor white people in America.

Second Look is a weekly content round-up of articles, videos, podcasts, and blog posts highlighting all things race, gender, and/or social justice. Feel free to discuss your thoughts or opinions in the comments below.

Thoughts about a Social Justice Warrior

Just about a year ago, Jackie texted me.

“Hey Cuz.  Hope you are well.  Can you give me a call this evening…”

Anytime someone sends a text asking you to call, that’s a bad sign.  It foreshadows something texts can’t handle.  “Damn,” I thought.

“Cousin,” she’d called me that since she and Pete got married in 1987; since his last name is Williams, folks assumed I was family.  After all, Williams is a pretty unique name for Black folks…that was a joke that never got old.  Even now, as I anticipated the worst.

“I have cancer.”  OK. I thought, maybe it’s not so bad.  Maybe it’s treatable.  Maybe they caught it early.  Maybe… Continue reading “Thoughts about a Social Justice Warrior”

“I didn’t choose to be straight, white and male”: Blinding privilege

The Pew Research Center found in July that while 63% of women surveyed found gender still posed obstacles for women’s progress, 56% of men said such challenges were mostly history.  Then, this week, a headline in The Guardian put a human face on that divide with this: “’I didn’t choose to be straight, white and male’: Are Modern Men the Suffering Sex?”

Uh, no.  Continue reading ““I didn’t choose to be straight, white and male”: Blinding privilege”

Capital Punishment and Race: Join the Conversation

Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Rachel Lyon’s “Race to Execution” comes to Cincinnati Law on September 21.

I no longer ask, “Do these people who committed these crimes deserve the death penalty?” I ask, “Does society deserve to kill people, when they’re so unwilling to engage in an honest conversation about the impact of race?”

Bryan Stevenson’s blunt question is at the heart of the provocative documentary Race to Execution. Cincinnati Law’s Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice and the YWCA of Greater Cincinnati will screen the film and host a panel discussion including filmmaker Rachel Lyon on September 21, 2016. Continue reading “Capital Punishment and Race: Join the Conversation”