October 2: International Day of Non-Violence

Cincinnati Law’s Domestic Violence/Civil Protection Order Clinic promotes the human right to be free from intimate partner violence.

On this International Day of Non-Violence, we go local.  That is, Cincinnati Law proudly celebrates its Domestic Violence and Civil Protection Order (DV/CPO) Clinic.

In addition to representing survivors, our Clinic students have highlighted the importance of addressing intimate partner violence. Namely five years ago this month, thanks to Cincinnati Law Professor Kenyatta Hurd and Clinic students, the Cincinnati City Council adopted a resolution recognizing freedom from domestic violence as a fundamental human right and declaring that the city, as well as state and local governments, have an obligation to secure this right. Continue reading “October 2: International Day of Non-Violence”

Ferguson, Baltimore…and Cincinnati: Lessons from DOJ Investigations

Terence Crutcher. Keith Lamont Scott.  Korryn Gaines. These are just some of the most recent additions to the growing roll of people killed by police. Communities across the nation struggle for answers, strategies, and, most importantly, an end to the violence.  On October 4, 2016, the University of Cincinnati will host this important discussion, building upon lessons learned from Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland.

DOJ found patterns of racial discrimination in stops, detentions, and use of force in both places.  In Ferguson, DOJ  said the police viewed African Americans “less as constituents to be protected than as potential offenders and sources of revenue.”  In Baltimore, DOJ found that the systemic constitutional violations stemmed from structural failures. What do these findings mean for other cities, including Cincinnati?

To be sure, Cincinnati has been cited as an exemplar for reform for troubled cities because of the collaborative agreement between the police and communities.  What can Cincinnati’s experience add to our understanding of race, class, and policing, particularly when it comes to addressing endemic inequities?

Co-sponsored by the Cincinnati Project of the College of Arts and Sciences and Cincinnati Law’s Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice,  a panel discussion will address these and other issues. Participants include the following: attorney Alphonse Gerhardstein, law professor Janet Moore, activist Iris Roley, history professor Tracy Teslow, and Africana Studies professor Earl Wright II.

The event begins at 3:30 p.m. in room 450 of the Lindner Center.  Please join us.

History Lessons: Women of Color and Work-Family Conflicts

Progressive work-family policies must encompass the diverse experiences of all women.

jocelynfrye_600x900Guest Contributor: Jocelyn C. Frye, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress

Author Toni Morrison once wrote, “If there’s a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”  Her words are a reminder that there is value in each woman’s unwritten story, and we are all empowered to write our own narratives.  Morrison’s charge is particularly timely in the present-day conversation about women, work, and family where incomplete soundbites too often substitute for  richer discussion about the diversity of women’s experiences and the history they bring to the table. This problem is especially acute when it comes to the discourse around work-family issues. Continue reading “History Lessons: Women of Color and Work-Family Conflicts”

Five Myths that Block Effective Strategies Targeting Sexual Assault on College Campuses

fatima-goss-graves-200-x-200Guest Contributor:  Fatima Goss Graves, Senior Vice President for Program, National Women’s Law Center

Students around the country have already begun pouring back onto college campuses, ready to embark on a new academic year. This year many students will return to find their schools under investigation by the Department of Education for failing to effectively address sexual violence on campus.  Title IX’s nearly 45-year-old ban on sex discrimination in education requires schools that take federal dollars –virtually all schools – to take prompt and effective steps to address harassment and violence. With over 200 universities facing pending complaints, the problem of sexual assault finally has caught the attention of the very policymakers and educators who can make a difference.

But efforts to transform the response to sexual assault will fail if focused on the wrong solutions. Here are five myths that can prevent meaningful approaches to combatting sexual assault on college campuses. Continue reading “Five Myths that Block Effective Strategies Targeting Sexual Assault on College Campuses”

Second Look – A week in review.

In NYC, Two Moms Describe the Intimacy of #BlackLivesMatter – An in depth look at modern motherhood in the looming shadow of implicit bias by police.

Ditch high heels to promote equality at work, Theresa May told – From across the pond, many are requesting that the British Prime Minister set an example for equality in the workplace and skip high heels in favor of flat footwear.

Jeffrey Tambor won an Emmy for playing a transgender woman, but even he thinks that’s problematicTransparent actor, Jeffrey Tambor, calls for Hollywood to look to trans actors to portray trans characters during his acceptance speech for Best Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. The Washington Post discusses his impassioned plea.

The Problem With Having All-White State Supreme Courts – TakePart discusses a lawsuit filed by the Alabama State Conference of the NAACP and four citizens, alleging that Alabama process for choosing appellate judges discriminate on the basis of race. The article takes special notice of Judge John H. England Jr., one of the three black justices to sit on the Alabama Supreme Court, and of the fact that 31 other states do not have an African American on their highest court.

Red State Blues – Jedediah Purdy for the New Republic discusses two books—one written by a native Appalachian and another by a sociologist—that delve into the relationship between Trump and Tea Party Conservatives.

Hari Kondabolu Says His Mom Is Hilarious – And Not Because of Her Accent – Hari Kondabolu, stand-up comedian, discusses race, identity, and white fragility in comedy.

Second Look is a monthly content round-up of articles, videos, podcasts, and blog posts highlighting all things race, gender, and/or social justice. Feel free to discuss your thoughts or opinions in the comments below.

Cincinnati Preschool Expansion, Issue 44: For our children and their teachers

Guest Contributor:  Clement Tsao, (Cincinnati Law ’12), Labor Attorney, Cook& Logothetis, LLC

Much has bclement-tsaoeen written about the benefits of preschool and quality early learning programs. Significant investments in preschool have been linked to improved kindergarten readiness, future academic success, a reduced achievement gap for students of color, as well as long-term savings on government and taxpayers. If you’re not yet convinced, you can check out some good research and writing on the arguments for preschool investment here, here, here and here.

But, high quality preschool isn’t just about education and economics; investment in preschool is also about labor policy. After all, it’s people, i.e., the teachers, who engage with our children and can be a determinative factor in a quality learning environment. That’s why investing in preschool also requires investing in our current and future preschool teachers.

This fall, Cincinnati voters will have the opportunity to do both, thanks to Issue 44.  Continue reading “Cincinnati Preschool Expansion, Issue 44: For our children and their teachers”

Second Look – A week in review.

The Armed Protests Outside Brock Turner’s Home Are Dangerously Counterproductive  – Christina Cauterucci of Slate discusses the impact of vigilante protesting.

At the Sacred Stone Camp, A Coalition Joins Forces to Protect the Land – A coalition is forming in North Dakota where a varied group of people are acting as protectors of the land seeking to stop the development of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The protestors prepare to act as resistance in the fight for the community’s right to land and clean water. This topic has garnered both national and international attention as a battle for the survival of Native people.

The Uncomfortable Truth about Children’s Books – Dashka Slater for Mother Jones discusses the complexities of publishing children’s books in a time when diversity is somehow mistaken from exclusion and social media polices publishers.

Ava DuVernay on Directing Queen Sugar, Properly Lighting Actors of Color, and Why She Used to Be More Brave – The Academy Award-nominated director of Selma discusses with the Vulture TV Podcast the stylistic and directorial decisions in her first foray into television with OWN’s Queen Sugar.

Are Cracker, White Trash, & Redneck Racist? – For MTV News Decoded, Franchesca Ramsey discusses the linguistic history, racial context, and classist realities of references for poor white people in America.

Second Look is a weekly content round-up of articles, videos, podcasts, and blog posts highlighting all things race, gender, and/or social justice. Feel free to discuss your thoughts or opinions in the comments below.