Down to the Wire. Have you registered?

The deadline is fast approaching. Don’t miss out.

This post is for all the procrastinators.  There was plenty of time to make sure your registration was up to date.  But not any more.

Ohio’s deadline is October 11, which is Tuesday. Right. Next week.

In Ohio, if you recently moved, changed your name, or haven’t voted since 2012, you may have be removed from the rolls.  To make certain you are registered, check here.  If you need to register, the necessary form and instructions on what to do are accessible here.   Don’t know where to vote?  Click this link to find your polling place.

Kentucky residents can register or update their voting status online. The same is true in Indiana. Twenty-nine other states and the District of Columbia also allow residents the option of registering online.  For more information and a chart to find out whether you can sign up, check, or update your registration status online, check out the National Conference of State Legislatures website.

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Don’t be this guy.  Register.

Don’t assume that you’ve got this covered.  After all, how are you going to feel when you roll up to the polling place on November 8 only to be turned away?

Just do it.

Take a step toward social justice.  Get registered.  And vote.

We’ve Come A Long Way… But Not Far Enough

Some progress, but miles to go in eradicating domestic violence.

tiffanny-smithGuest Contributor: Tiffanny Smith, Litigation Attorney, Ohio Justice & Policy Center

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.  We’ve all seen the newspaper articles, social media posts, and awareness events.  Is that enough?

More than 10 MILLION people suffer physical abuse at the hands of an intimate partner each year in the U.S.  Continue reading “We’ve Come A Long Way… But Not Far Enough”

The Female Criminal Defense Attorney Flying Solo

The Bollywood Lawyer shares her perspective from the trenches.

Guest Contributor:  Seema Iye0a1a120r

These days everyone thinks it’s like Viola Davis a la “How to Get Away with Murder” – strutting into court in skin-tight sleeveless suits with a legal entourage of paralegals, investigators and interns.

Hardly.

The female criminal defense attorney’s life is nothing like that. Though I’m all in praise of network television paying homage to our life of solitude; a woman solo practitioner is a rarity.  Continue reading “The Female Criminal Defense Attorney Flying Solo”

Beyond Policing: “From Re-entry to No Entry”

Experts explain that structural reforms are necessary to stop police killings at Cincinnati Law/Cincinnati Project event.

How can the University of Cincinnati prepare for the trial of Ray Tensing?  That’s the question audience members are contemplating after today’s panel discussion, “DOJ Reports on Policing in Ferguson and Baltimore:  What They Mean for Cincinnati and the Country.”

The Cincinnati Project, UC’s Center for Student Affairs, and Cincinnati Law’s Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice collaborated to  present five experts to discuss police killings across the nation.  Using the Department of Justice’s reports on Ferguson and Baltimore as a springboard, panelists examined such issues as the root causes of police violence against people of color, challenged the existence of a just criminal justice system, and urged a re-examination of the meaning of “public safety” that includes input from affected communities.   Continue reading “Beyond Policing: “From Re-entry to No Entry””

October 2: International Day of Non-Violence

Cincinnati Law’s Domestic Violence/Civil Protection Order Clinic promotes the human right to be free from intimate partner violence.

On this International Day of Non-Violence, we go local.  That is, Cincinnati Law proudly celebrates its Domestic Violence and Civil Protection Order (DV/CPO) Clinic.

In addition to representing survivors, our Clinic students have highlighted the importance of addressing intimate partner violence. Namely five years ago this month, thanks to Cincinnati Law Professor Kenyatta Hurd and Clinic students, the Cincinnati City Council adopted a resolution recognizing freedom from domestic violence as a fundamental human right and declaring that the city, as well as state and local governments, have an obligation to secure this right. Continue reading “October 2: International Day of Non-Violence”

Ferguson, Baltimore…and Cincinnati: Lessons from DOJ Investigations

Terence Crutcher. Keith Lamont Scott.  Korryn Gaines. These are just some of the most recent additions to the growing roll of people killed by police. Communities across the nation struggle for answers, strategies, and, most importantly, an end to the violence.  On October 4, 2016, the University of Cincinnati will host this important discussion, building upon lessons learned from Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland.

DOJ found patterns of racial discrimination in stops, detentions, and use of force in both places.  In Ferguson, DOJ  said the police viewed African Americans “less as constituents to be protected than as potential offenders and sources of revenue.”  In Baltimore, DOJ found that the systemic constitutional violations stemmed from structural failures. What do these findings mean for other cities, including Cincinnati?

To be sure, Cincinnati has been cited as an exemplar for reform for troubled cities because of the collaborative agreement between the police and communities.  What can Cincinnati’s experience add to our understanding of race, class, and policing, particularly when it comes to addressing endemic inequities?

Co-sponsored by the Cincinnati Project of the College of Arts and Sciences and Cincinnati Law’s Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice,  a panel discussion will address these and other issues. Participants include the following: attorney Alphonse Gerhardstein, law professor Janet Moore, activist Iris Roley, history professor Tracy Teslow, and Africana Studies professor Earl Wright II.

The event begins at 3:30 p.m. in room 450 of the Lindner Center.  Please join us.

History Lessons: Women of Color and Work-Family Conflicts

Progressive work-family policies must encompass the diverse experiences of all women.

jocelynfrye_600x900Guest Contributor: Jocelyn C. Frye, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress

Author Toni Morrison once wrote, “If there’s a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”  Her words are a reminder that there is value in each woman’s unwritten story, and we are all empowered to write our own narratives.  Morrison’s charge is particularly timely in the present-day conversation about women, work, and family where incomplete soundbites too often substitute for  richer discussion about the diversity of women’s experiences and the history they bring to the table. This problem is especially acute when it comes to the discourse around work-family issues. Continue reading “History Lessons: Women of Color and Work-Family Conflicts”