A Second Look

Here are some items that caught our eye:

2370_regUniversity of Dayton Sociology Professor Dr. Jamie Longazel recently published  Undocumented Fears, which examines immigration and the racialization that occurs in small towns. Berkeley Law Prof. Ian Haney Lopez says

Jamie Longazel brings into sharp focus the anti-Latino racism at the heart of national politics today. Even as we as a society struggle to build solidarity across racial divisions, powerful forces seek advantage in tearing us farther apart. The concentrated focus of Undocumented Fears helps us understand not only why this occurs but also how we might help replace fear with friendship, social division with a sense of shared humanity.


Looking for the next binge-worthy program?  Netflix’s Dear White People is absolutely dearwhitepeoplerelevant and important. And, it’s being renewed for second season!

Speaking of television, BBC just announced that 13 is the charm–the next Dr. Who will be a woman.

 


Does it ever appear that racial vigilantes — for example, George Zimmerman, the man who killed Trayvon Martin–are presumed innocent?  Race and the Law Prof Blog takes on that topic.


And, in the “can’t wait!” category:  

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Director Ava Duvernay’s A Wrinkle in Time hits theaters March 9, 2018!  Can’t come soon enough. maxresdefault

Second Look – A month in review.

White Parents: Teaching Our Kids To Be Colorblind Is Not The Answer – Kristi Pahr delves into the problematic parenting concept of colorblind ideology. Her short piece reviews the failures of the colorblind narrative and the importance of celebrating differences.

Continue reading “Second Look – A month in review.”

Second Look – A month in review.

Confessions Of A Lesbian Refugee From Iran – Iranian refugee, Jannat, thought the US would be heavenly, but with a looming Trump presidency, her fears are heightened on several levels. The Establishment discusses Jannat’s experiences as both a refugee and a member of the LGBT community.

Accessibility Problematic for Girls with Disabilities – Marginalization is common for women with disabilities in the workplace and beyond. Many women feel unable to participate in community activities due to accessibility. Women’s eNews talked with disabled women to shed light on the issue.

The Tricky Thing About Being Trans and Having a Mental Illness – The Editors at Everyday Feminism have created a comic that attempts to break down and explain the experience of trans folks with mental illnesses. The comic is a short, yet informative, look into the mind of someone with a mental illness who is also faced with a barrage of negative messages about their identity.

Continue reading “Second Look – A month in review.”

Second Look – A month in review.

Why are 63 million girls missing out on education? – Lucy Lamble for Global Education podcast explores the numerous barriers preventing girls in conflict zones and rural, impoverished communities from obtaining education.

LGBTQ and Other “Diverse” Books Lead Banned Books List – September 26 through September 30 was Banned Book Week, but it’s not too late to pick up a literary outlaw. Sarah Seltzer for Flavorwire examines the American Library Association’s challenged book list and the inclusion of LGBTQ themed literature.

This DJ mixes the world’s local music to create a global sound – Jace Clayton is a DJ who mixes musical styles from across the globe to tell a universal story about the unexpected moments of music creation.

Student at Liberal Afghanistan College Shares Horror of Attack – Alia, a 16-year-old student at the American University of Afghanistan (AUAF), recounts the horror of feigning death during the Taliban takeover of AUAF. Alia shares her story as a writer for the Afghan Women’s Writing Project.

This Chinese-American cartoonist forces us to face racist stereotypes – Cartoonist Gene Luen Yang was awarded a MacArthur Genius Grant this year. In an interview with PBS, he discusses his use of comics to tell a story which creates a more emotional impact on the reader than through mere text.

Amicus: 2016 Term Preview – Slate’s Amicus podcast previews the 2016 Supreme Court term. Host Dahlia Lithwick explores the constitutionality of stop-and-frisk tactics with former federal judge Shira Scheindlin. Also, SCOTUSblog founder and publisher Tom Goldstein provides discourse on the cases the Court will hear this term.

East New York painter confronts the ‘brutal’ forces of gentrification– Gentrification is explored through the eyes of artist Patrick Eugéne. Paint is used as a medium to immortalize the disruption of every day, close-knit communities for the profit of house flipping developers.

Opinionated: How Voter Registration Laws Impact Latinxs– Roger Quesada’s Opinionated delves into the obstacles Latinx voters face at the polls.

More Asian-Americans Are Identifying as Democrats, Survey Finds – A study finds that Asian-American support for Democratic presidential candidates has increased faster than support among any other racial group.

Is the US failing its inmates? – Al Jazeera takes an in-depth look at the poor conditions of US prisons and the prisoners striking to make a change. Prisoners across the country went on strike on September 9th to mark the 45th anniversary of the Attica prison riot.

The Asian American Experience In America – Congresswoman Grace Meng discusses the results of the 2016 National Asian American Survey. Representative Meng challenges Americans to ‘do better’ and fight against racist, lazy stereotypes dominating both Hollywood and the mainstream media.

Jesse Williams and Amir Whitaker: Brown v. Board of Education Is a Broken Promise – America Divided documentary “The Class Divide” is profiled by Time. The documentary highlights the inequity of the U.S. educational system 60 years post Brown.

A Photographer Gives Cameras To Child Brides. Their Images Are Amazing – Photographer Stephanie Sinclair has taken photos of child bride across the globe for 15 years. As a form of art therapy, Sinclair provided some young women with the chance to tell their own story through digital photography.

Mexican man accused of raping eight-year-old ordered to buy her father beer – In rural Mexico, the customs and traditions rule the people. While humanitarian efforts are succeeding in improving the lives of women and girls, gender equality in indigenous communities is struggling.

Sex Trafficking Survivor Says It’s Time to Stop Glamorizing Prostitution – A victim of sex trafficking, Rebecca Bender, discusses her experience as a prostitute. Bender discusses her reasons behind rejecting the Hollywood legitimization of prostitution and pimp culture.

 


Second Look is a monthly content round-up of articles, videos, podcasts, and blog posts highlighting all things race, gender, and/or social justice. Feel free to discuss your thoughts or opinions in the comments below.

Second Look – A week in review.

In NYC, Two Moms Describe the Intimacy of #BlackLivesMatter – An in depth look at modern motherhood in the looming shadow of implicit bias by police.

Ditch high heels to promote equality at work, Theresa May told – From across the pond, many are requesting that the British Prime Minister set an example for equality in the workplace and skip high heels in favor of flat footwear.

Jeffrey Tambor won an Emmy for playing a transgender woman, but even he thinks that’s problematicTransparent actor, Jeffrey Tambor, calls for Hollywood to look to trans actors to portray trans characters during his acceptance speech for Best Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. The Washington Post discusses his impassioned plea.

The Problem With Having All-White State Supreme Courts – TakePart discusses a lawsuit filed by the Alabama State Conference of the NAACP and four citizens, alleging that Alabama process for choosing appellate judges discriminate on the basis of race. The article takes special notice of Judge John H. England Jr., one of the three black justices to sit on the Alabama Supreme Court, and of the fact that 31 other states do not have an African American on their highest court.

Red State Blues – Jedediah Purdy for the New Republic discusses two books—one written by a native Appalachian and another by a sociologist—that delve into the relationship between Trump and Tea Party Conservatives.

Hari Kondabolu Says His Mom Is Hilarious – And Not Because of Her Accent – Hari Kondabolu, stand-up comedian, discusses race, identity, and white fragility in comedy.

Second Look is a monthly content round-up of articles, videos, podcasts, and blog posts highlighting all things race, gender, and/or social justice. Feel free to discuss your thoughts or opinions in the comments below.

Second Look – A week in review.

The Armed Protests Outside Brock Turner’s Home Are Dangerously Counterproductive  – Christina Cauterucci of Slate discusses the impact of vigilante protesting.

At the Sacred Stone Camp, A Coalition Joins Forces to Protect the Land – A coalition is forming in North Dakota where a varied group of people are acting as protectors of the land seeking to stop the development of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The protestors prepare to act as resistance in the fight for the community’s right to land and clean water. This topic has garnered both national and international attention as a battle for the survival of Native people.

The Uncomfortable Truth about Children’s Books – Dashka Slater for Mother Jones discusses the complexities of publishing children’s books in a time when diversity is somehow mistaken from exclusion and social media polices publishers.

Ava DuVernay on Directing Queen Sugar, Properly Lighting Actors of Color, and Why She Used to Be More Brave – The Academy Award-nominated director of Selma discusses with the Vulture TV Podcast the stylistic and directorial decisions in her first foray into television with OWN’s Queen Sugar.

Are Cracker, White Trash, & Redneck Racist? – For MTV News Decoded, Franchesca Ramsey discusses the linguistic history, racial context, and classist realities of references for poor white people in America.

Second Look is a weekly content round-up of articles, videos, podcasts, and blog posts highlighting all things race, gender, and/or social justice. Feel free to discuss your thoughts or opinions in the comments below.