Inside Higher Education: The New Cap on Student Loans

The Stakes Are Too High To Lower Support. 

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Image from Inside Higher Education

UC Law Alum Christopher P. Chapman argues a proposed new cap on federal student loan borrowing will severely impact students pursuing graduate and professional education.

“Anyone can get a car loan, right? And people don’t get those off the backs of taxpayers. That’s what private lenders are for. What’s so different about student loans? Private lenders will fill the gap, just like they do for people who can’t buy cars with cash, and everybody’s happy. Perhaps at first blush that argument appears to make sense, but it leans on a false equivalency that places the future of real people at risk and creates the potential that society will ultimately become less than it could be.”

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Five Myths that Block Effective Strategies Targeting Sexual Assault on College Campuses

fatima-goss-graves-200-x-200Guest Contributor:  Fatima Goss Graves, Senior Vice President for Program, National Women’s Law Center

Students around the country have already begun pouring back onto college campuses, ready to embark on a new academic year. This year many students will return to find their schools under investigation by the Department of Education for failing to effectively address sexual violence on campus.  Title IX’s nearly 45-year-old ban on sex discrimination in education requires schools that take federal dollars –virtually all schools – to take prompt and effective steps to address harassment and violence. With over 200 universities facing pending complaints, the problem of sexual assault finally has caught the attention of the very policymakers and educators who can make a difference.

But efforts to transform the response to sexual assault will fail if focused on the wrong solutions. Here are five myths that can prevent meaningful approaches to combatting sexual assault on college campuses. Continue reading “Five Myths that Block Effective Strategies Targeting Sexual Assault on College Campuses”

Cincinnati Preschool Expansion, Issue 44: For our children and their teachers

Guest Contributor:  Clement Tsao, (Cincinnati Law ’12), Labor Attorney, Cook& Logothetis, LLC

Much has bclement-tsaoeen written about the benefits of preschool and quality early learning programs. Significant investments in preschool have been linked to improved kindergarten readiness, future academic success, a reduced achievement gap for students of color, as well as long-term savings on government and taxpayers. If you’re not yet convinced, you can check out some good research and writing on the arguments for preschool investment here, here, here and here.

But, high quality preschool isn’t just about education and economics; investment in preschool is also about labor policy. After all, it’s people, i.e., the teachers, who engage with our children and can be a determinative factor in a quality learning environment. That’s why investing in preschool also requires investing in our current and future preschool teachers.

This fall, Cincinnati voters will have the opportunity to do both, thanks to Issue 44.  Continue reading “Cincinnati Preschool Expansion, Issue 44: For our children and their teachers”

Spelman College: Leading at the Intersections of Race, Gender, and Sexuality

Spelman considers admitting transgender students.

Spelman College President Mary Schmidt Campbell welcomed students and staff alike to the new academic year with a news-breaking short letter.  Tucked among paragraphs about strategic planning and enrollment figures, was an announcement about a new task force—one that would recommend whether the storied historically black college for women should admit transgender students.

If Spelman changes its admissions policy, it would join the so-called “Seven Sisters” colleges in opening its doors to trans women.

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But even more importantly, breaking down this barrier would strike at the heart of racial and gender hierarchies limiting African Americans.

 

 

Continue reading “Spelman College: Leading at the Intersections of Race, Gender, and Sexuality”

Black Girls and Zero Tolerance: A Call to Action

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Guest Contributor: Barbara Perez, President and CEO of the YWCA Greater Cincinnati

In Cincinnati, African-American girls are five times more likely to be suspended from school than white boys and nearly nine times more likely to be suspended than other girls. Nationally, black girls are suspended from school more than any other group of girls and at a much higher rate than white, Asian and Latino boys.

This is one of the consequences of “zero-tolerance” policies which use suspension, expulsion and even arrests in response to a range of school-based incidents. While originally enacted to address cases of violent behavior and drug use, the Department of Education recently reported that 95 percent of out-of-school suspensions are now passed out for nonviolent, minor disruptions such as tardiness or disrespect.

Continue reading “Black Girls and Zero Tolerance: A Call to Action”