No Lost Generation at UC

 

nlg

No Lost Generation at the University of Cincinnati is a student group aiming to support the ongoing global refugee crisis in the Syria. The group, tasked by the United States Department of State, works to ensure that the current generation of displaced is not lost to history. NLG has three pillars: education, child protection, and engaging adolescents and youth. NLG raises awareness and funds to support current non-governmental organizations (NGOs) already involved in raising awareness in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, and Egypt – refugee hosting countries.

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The Reminder

IMG_0671Today is International Women’s Day and I find myself reflecting upon the women who raised me and the lessons I learned from each and every one of them. From my mom, to my aunts, to the grandmother I spent so many summers with, each taught me something unique about what it means to be a woman.

Sometimes it’s hard for me to see eye-to-eye with the women who raised me. We disagree on a lot of fundamentals and that makes it hard to have a relationship with them.

This is an ode to the women who brought me up. It is a reminder to myself that change is hard for some folks, but that doesn’t mean I should stop trying.

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Juries and LGBT Litigants: Berthiaume v. Smith

David Wovrosh, Cincinnati Law 2L, summarizes Berthaiume v. Smith for the National Association for Public Defense. The case, decided by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals, involves LGBT litigants and jury member bias. David writes:

In Berthiaume v. Smith, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals held that jury members may be questioned during voir dire regarding latent bias predicated on sexual orientation.   Relying on its decision in United States v. Bates and the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Rosales-Lopez v. United States, the Eleventh Circuit concluded that, where matters of sexual orientation are “inextricably bound up” with the facts of the case, LGBT litigants are entitled to constitutional protections against jury bias.

To learn more about NAPD’s involvement in the case and for the full text of David’s summary, please visit the National Association for Public Defense.

 

February at the Center for RGSJ

Greetings from the Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice!  We have a very busy February schedule!  Check out the below roster of this month’s programs and events which we hope will be of interest to you. If you would like further information on any of these events, don’t hesitate to email us at LawRGSJ@uc.edu.  If you’re a local reader, we hope to see you at this month’s events!

Date/Time/Location Program/Event
Thurs., Feb. 16 @ 6pm in TUC’s Great Hall #BlackLivesMatter movement co-founder Patrisse Cullors will be on campus to give a talk entitled, “Resistance is Essential: The Continuing Fight for Black and Queer Lives.” It’s sure to be packed so get there early!
Fri., Feb. 17 @ 8:30am-2:30pm at the African American Cultural Resource Center (AACRC) UC’s The Cincinnati Project is hosting their 3rd Annual Symposium .  Leading Black feminist scholar Dr. Patricia Hill Collins, distinguished university professor at the University of Maryland and Charles Phelps Taft Emeritus Professor of Sociology in the Department of African American Studies here at the University of Cincinnati, is keynoting. You can register here for free!
Fri., Feb. 24 @ 9:30am-4:30pm at TUC (room locations TBD) Dr. Tanisha Ford will keynote the inaugural Creating Black Feminist Futures Symposium (which is co-sponsored by the RGSJ Center).  Registration for the Symposium closes on Friday, February 10th.  Register here for free.
Mon., Feb. 27 @ 12:15-1:15pm in the Crow’s Nest UC Law alum and ProKids Executive Director Tracy Cook (‘90) will join us for a Coffee Corner where she’ll discuss how students can get involved with the important work of her organization.  Bring your lunch and share some coffee and cookies with us.
Mon., Feb. 27 @ 5:30-7:30pm at the Mercantile Library The YWCA, Mercantile, and the Intercommunity Justice and Peace Center are co-hosting the first in a series called “Days of Dialogue,” based on the work of Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of Between the World and Me and frequent contributor to The Atlantic.  Register for this event here.  The Center will also be hosting a Days of Dialogue session on April 5 – stay tuned for details!
Mon., Mar. 1 @ 5-7:30pm at TUC  (we know, technically not February but close enough!) UC’s Chapter of the 1 in 3 Campaign is hosting Activist-in-Residence, Jennifer Baumgardner, as part of Women’s History Month and QueerCat Pride Week.  You can learn more and register for free tickets here.

 

 

Second Look – A month in review.

White Parents: Teaching Our Kids To Be Colorblind Is Not The Answer – Kristi Pahr delves into the problematic parenting concept of colorblind ideology. Her short piece reviews the failures of the colorblind narrative and the importance of celebrating differences.

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Second Look – A month in review.

Confessions Of A Lesbian Refugee From Iran – Iranian refugee, Jannat, thought the US would be heavenly, but with a looming Trump presidency, her fears are heightened on several levels. The Establishment discusses Jannat’s experiences as both a refugee and a member of the LGBT community.

Accessibility Problematic for Girls with Disabilities – Marginalization is common for women with disabilities in the workplace and beyond. Many women feel unable to participate in community activities due to accessibility. Women’s eNews talked with disabled women to shed light on the issue.

The Tricky Thing About Being Trans and Having a Mental Illness – The Editors at Everyday Feminism have created a comic that attempts to break down and explain the experience of trans folks with mental illnesses. The comic is a short, yet informative, look into the mind of someone with a mental illness who is also faced with a barrage of negative messages about their identity.

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Shoulders back, hood up.

lukecagepromo.jpgThe ensemble of Marvel’s Luke Cage is an array of blackness, of brownness, a portrayal that is absent of whiteness. One man holds vigil for the white community and [SPOILER ALERT] he’s a bad guy. I’ve never watched a TV show that didn’t provide a multitude of supporting characters who looked like me. Usually, I can put myself into the shoes of a character because they look like me; they sound like me; they face the same hardships I face. This experience was, for me, otherworldly. In my world, superheroes are white. Even female superheroes are white: Wonder Woman, Supergirl, Black Widow, Rogue, Elektra, Jessica Jones, Catwoman (with the exception of the portrayal by Halle Berry), even the Powerpuff Girls are pale with colorful eyes. Storm is the only recognizable black female superhero, but I don’t see her getting her own stand-alone anytime soon.

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